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Choice of approaches


Our therapists offer several different approaches depending on client needs. These include Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and EMDR.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) looks at the interaction between thoughts, feelings and behaviours.  If we have ways of experiencing the world that lead us into problems with colleagues, relationship difficulties, or traps us with negative thoughts about ourselves, it may be worth trying to explore what’s going on.
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Psychodynamic Therapy

 

Psychodynamic therapy also looks at patterns of how we experience the world. If life has been difficult, perhaps with family break-ups, or stressed-out parents, or other setbacks, this may have left us experiencing the world as rejecting, uncaring or unreliable. Or it may be something in our own psychological make-up that makes us feel this way.

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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) offers a slightly different way of understanding psychological distress, holding that some pain and upset is part of living, but it is how we respond to this that causes problems.
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Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing

 

EMDR is an innovative treatment originally developed for treating traumatic memories where people might be struggling with flashbacks, nightmares or intrusive thoughts, perhaps as a result of being in combat zones, or from violence or abuse.

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Existential Therapy

 

Existential therapy is rooted in existential philosophy, which is concerned with what it means to exist and to be human. It is a practical, collaborative and relational approach which sheds light on how we come to choose and perpetuate our own unique way of navigating life and relationships, and the difficulties this sometimes brings.
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Integrative Psychotherapy

 

Integrative Psychotherapy is not an approach in itself, rather it acknowledges that someone coming to therapy might require a combination of several different approaches in order to feel better.  An integrative therapist takes the view that there is not one single approach that will help the client in all situations and that there are many different facets to a therapeutic problem – the cognitive, the behavioural, the relational, the emotional and the social.

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